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The Trilogy of Painful Changes at Philadelphia Tech and Design week 4/10-5/10/2019

Out of Site

Saturday, October 5, 2019
3:00 PM – 6:30 PM
Sunday, October 6, 2019
3:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Twenty-Two Gallery  
Gallery B  
236 S. 22nd Street  
Philadelphia, 19103 

https://designphiladelphia.org/out-site

Three limited-engagement exhibitions (originally online for Philly Tech Week 2016 and 2017 and on-site for DesignPhiladelphia 2016) featured technology-based works such as websites, software, apps, twitter feeds, etc., and were defined as Out of Frame (disruptive tech), Out of Context (displaced visual language), and Out of Bounds (playful and experimental), respectively. The participating new media artists will showcase their work for another immersive limited engagement, live for DesignPhiladelphia 2019 at Twenty-Two Gallery’s new lower-level space. Artists include Caspar Below, Josh Fishburn, Eric Juth, Tyler Kline, Dermot Mac Cormack, Jon Montenegro, Lisa Marie Patzer, S/N, and TangenT ArT CollecTive. Curated by Belinda Haikes and Gaby Heit.

The Disjointed Changelog

The Disjointed Changelog distorts the classical fable storyline, referencing coding languages and concepts of innovation in computing history to tell a story of two friends struggling with change.

The video is part of the Trilogy of Painful Changes, which has been shown in museums and at festivals in Europe and the US since 2015.

THE RE-ENACTMENT

This video follows four artists, contracted for one hour to perform on demand. Their concern of what they may be made to do in the next hour, lends a twist to their performance, as they are asked to reenact seminal video art pieces from recent art history. 

TRILOGY OF PAINFUL CHANGES, AT THE VIDEO BAR, ANGLIA RUSKIN UNIVERSITY, 15TH OCT – 1ST NOV 2015

The Trilogy of Painful Changes tells the story of three different experiences of difficult or hard to accept transformations and paradigm shifts.The different perspectives are told as digital fables, using abstract characters in a familiar storytelling format. The text based video animations use glitch aesthetics and speed reading technology to set the characters on a collision course at a rate of up to 300 words per minute.  

three video stills of the videos

The End of Ebb and Flow describes the double act of opposing forces and characters, bound to each other by mutual dependency and disdain, to illustrate the invisible linkages that may exist at the heart of our physical and virtual communities, and the lack of control over the outcomes our actions may have.

Modernity on the Outhouse is based on Aesop’s fable the Kid and the Outhouse, rewritten to contrast the concepts of Modernity and Tradition in a fictional encounter, to satirise their relationship. The story is framed by “glitch video”-fragments, footage created through the corruption of digital files.

The Disjointed Changelog is the centre piece of the trilogy. It distorts the classical fable storyline, referencing coding languages and concepts of innovation in computing history to tell a story of two friends struggling with change. The video has been developed in response to the Cambridge Centre for Computing History’s collection. 

The Trilogy of Painful Changes is part of Art Language Location’s Supertext Programme and can be seen in the Video Bar at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU).

Opening dates: 15 October – 1 November 2015

Opening times: Monday – Saturday 10.00 – 17.00

Further info: http://artlanguagelocation.org/supertext/

Location:

Video Bar

Anglia Ruskin University Campus

East Road

Cambridge

CB1 1PT

Directions:

Enter ARU via East Road. Pick up a guide at reception and follow the signs to find the artworks.

The video bar is located on the lower ground floor beneath the Ruskin Gallery at Anglia Ruskin University. It’s best accessed by following the signs for the Ruskin Gallery, then downstairs to the Video Bar.

THE DISJOINTED CHANGELOG, AT THE CENTRE FOR COMPUTING HISTORY, CAMBRIDGE 15TH OCT-1ST NOVEMBER 2015

The Disjointed Changelog is a text based video distorting the classical fable storyline, referencing coding languages and concepts of innovation in computing history to tell a story of two friends struggling with change. The video has been developed around an ongoing dialogue with the Cambridge Centre for Computing History and is being shown in the context of the seminal machines, games and artefacts that made computing history. This showing of this video is part of the Art Language Location 2015 Satelllite programme 

Location:

Centre for Computing History
Rene Court
Coldhams Road
Cambridge
CB1 3EW

Directions:
The Disjointed Changelog is shown in the context of the Cambridge Centre Computing History’s permanent collection.

The museum is on an industrial estate, which is very close to the Beehive Shopping Centre in the east of Cambridge.

Public Transport

From the City Centre and passing the Anglia Ruskin Campus, the number 114 towards Addenbrookes or 17 towards Fulbourn to get off on Coldhams Lane, at the stop opposite Brampton Road (Stop: 0500CCITY154).

Alternatively, on a nice day, the Bus Citi 3 will take you to a stop near Ditton Walk, from where you can take the panoramic path across Coldhamn’s Commons to Coldhams Lane (10min walk).

From Coldhams Lane, follow the road round to your right onto Coldhams Road on to the commercial estate. Just before the railway crossing, turn into Rene Court on the right and you will see the Centre for Computing History there.

By Bike

Use the CycleStreets website to find out how to get to the Centre for Computing History by bike : CycleStreets

Driving

From the Beehive Centre, take the 3rd exit off the roundabout and go over the railway bridge. Immediately after the bridge there is a very sharp, double back left hand turn. Take that turn into the commercial estate and follow the road round to your right. Just before the railway crossing, turn into Rene Court on the right and you will see us there.

Tickets:

The entry fee is £8 for adults and £6 for children between 5 and 16. Under 5’s are free. A family ticket is available for £20 for up to two adults and two children.